Cycling 101 – part 1

When we first get into cycling it seems quite easy, as long as we already know how to ride a bicycle. After a while however, we discover that there is more to cycling than meets the eye. There are questions about safety, maintenance and other issues. Thankfully, experienced road men have already figured them out.

Choosing a bicycle

This seemingly simple task might quickly become overwhelming once we dig in to the variety of types of bicycles on the market. In general we can divide bicycles into the following categories:

Time trial bicycles – highly specialized bicycles used for racing against the clock. They are built to be as aerodynamic as possible often at the cost of adding more weight. Definitely not a bicycle you want to start with. The riding position is very demanding and use of the bicycle quite limited due to the way it is built. Outside of time trials they are also used in triathlons where the cycling leg is effectively nothing more than a time trial.

Aero bikes – road racing bicycles where the emphasis is once again put on low aerodynamic drag. They look more like your regular road bike and are much more versatile than time trial bikes. Their aerodynamic shape however, again, comes at the price of increased weight.

Climbing bikes – lightweight racing bicycles with the primary purpose of conquering those long and steep climbs. They are usable everyday bicycles and quite nice to ride due to their low weight. The gearing is adapted to climbing, so this type of bicycle might be a disadvantage in flat-road racing scenarios.

Endurance bicycles – The geometry of these bicycles is more relaxed, making them more comfortable to ride and easier to handle. The rider’s position is not as demanding, which allows for longer rides on roads with poor surfaces, without feeling tired after a mere 60 miles.

Gravel bikes – Here the geometry is becoming even more relaxed and the bicycle is even easier to handle. This type of bicycle is usually equipped with wider tyres. The build of these bicycles is sturdy and robust, so they can handle unpaved roads and trails. All that comes, of course, at the price of increased weight.

Cyclocross bikes – These bicycles have the qualities of gravel bikes taken up a notch with added handling capabilities for tight and twisty cyclocross courses. They are stiffer, which makes them less comfortable than gravel bikes. Also, their frame has a shape that makes it easier to shoulder the bicycle while running over obstacles.

Hybrid bikes / fitness bikes –  This is a general category of bicycles with quite relaxed geometry and typically straight handlebars (as opposed to drop handlebars) and wider tyres. They are not meant for racing or long demanding rides, but rather for casual, relaxing spins. They also make for good commuter bikes although the previously discussed types of bicycles would do just fine in that role (with the exception of TT bikes).

Touring bikes – These are the bicycle equivalent of camper vans. They are meant for long days and sometimes weeks of cycling. They are heavy but extremely robust. They have mounts for racks and panniers so you can take your camping equipment and other luggage with you.

Cross country bikes – Now we are entering the realm of mountain bikes. The cross country (XC) bike is the most versatile. This type of bike usually has a shorter suspension travel compared to other mountain bikes. XC bikes are lighter and suitable for climbing those steep mountain trails. They are also quite acceptable on the road, so if you need to commute before you hit that local trail, the XC bike is a great choice.

Trail bikes – These are heavier than XC bikes with longer suspension travel and slacker geometry, meaning the rider is positioned further back in relation to the center of the bike and the front wheel is further out in front. Still, they are suitable for some climbing but are most at home on long singletracks in the countryside.

Freeride / All mountain bikes – I lumped both of these types of bikes together as they represent a progression from the trail bike. The suspension travel increases, the geometry is even more slack, and they are less suitable for climbing. The emphasis is on the ability to perform big jumps and tricks while going mostly downhill.

Downhill bikes – a specialized machine for going downhill. That’s it. It is reflected in a very long suspension travel and lack of gearing for any type of climbing. Instead these bikes are equipped with large brake rotors to be able to stop effectively. The cool factor is high but stay away from this type of bicycle unless you want to take part in serious downhill racing.

That concludes my short breakdown of the types of bicycles available on the market. It is up to you, dear reader, to decide which would suit you best. Remember that nothing beats getting on a particular bicycle and trying it for yourself. If you have questions, feel free to ask them in the comments section below.

Check back for part 2 in two weeks and don’t forget to subscribe so you don’t miss the next blog post.

Episode 13: Cycling with David Elton


This time my guest is David Elton who covers more road in Kerry on a bicycle than most others. David is a hard-core cyclist, cycling blogger and co-author of the Cycling Kerry guidebook which he wrote with Donnacha Clifford who was our guest on the episode 4 of the podcast. In this episode David and I discuss many cycling related topics. We talk about cycling culture in Holland, cycling across Scandinavia, David’s recent trip to Mallorca and a local cycling club The Chain Gang.

Don’t forget to visit https://www.kerrycyclingguidebook.com/ where you can purchase David’s and Donnacha’s book.

Safety in the outdoors

Taking on outdoor activities alone can offer a unique experience. Being able to focus on fishing, hunting, cycling or trail running without distractions provides an opportunity to enter a meditative state of mind and deeply connect with nature For that reason, many sportsmen prefer to spend time outdoors in solitude. But before you go out to hunt in the woods or fly fish from the rocks, all by yourself, you should take some basic safety precautions.

My friends and I spend countless hours in the outdoors, doing our thing, on our own. That often resulted in some hairy situations. This allowed us not only to better understand the dangers, but also to develop some basic practices. They could lower the risk or save our lives if things were to go sideways. In this short article, I would like to discuss some of those practices.

outdoors-safety

Whenever you are cycling, running or swimming, there is a wide variety of GPS-enabled electronic devices at your disposal. These days, most of them can connect to your phone and transmit your location. Some of them even offer functions like crash-detection or fall-detection. In theory, they will trigger a notification to the phone number of your choice, about the emergency that has likely just occurred.

It might be a good idea to use this this type of technology. However, I would advise you to keep in mind a few things. These are usually simple consumer electronic devices, so they are not built or tested to be trusted with your life. They should be considered as bonus gizmos and not as the primary means of ensuring your safety. You will quickly find evidence of that while examining the user’s manuals. Nothing beats the old and still best method: tell someone trustworthy, a family member or a true friend, where you are going and what time you intend to come back. Make sure to inform them if you decide to change your plans. You can also agree up-front to an action they should take in case you do not make contact by the agreed time. Trust is a key factor here.

slippery

Another good practice is to wear a bracelet or a tag with your name, blood type and emergency contact number. This simple item might be invaluable, in the event that something bad happens to you while you are with your friends. The likelihood that they will know your blood type is slim. Remember that having an ID with you is not the same. Reaching into your pockets might not be your friend’s first instinct while dealing with a likely stressful situation. Also, make sure that the information is well protected from the elements, eg. engraved or written with a waterproof pen.

I hope these simple tips will make you think about safety. I also hope you will never be in the situation that someone will have to make use of your tag or trigger an emergency procedure. Stay safe and I will see you in the outdoors!

Episode 10: Waterford Greenway and wellbeing with Bernadette Phillips


In this episode, I visited sunny Waterford to meet Bernadette Phillips, sociologist, motivational speaker, radio broadcaster and the founder of New Insights For Change, to talk about Waterford Greenway. As it turned out, the greenway was only a background to a great conversation about the profound importance of the outdoors and connecting with nature.

Episode 8: Housekeeping


In this episode I’m talking about some news related to the podcast. Launch of the new website https://tommysoutdoors.com and more. Also answering some frequently asked questions. Sea trout fishing marks and regulations. Bicycle helmets. Cyclists and runners safety in early morning and evening hours. Listen, share and subscribe!

Episode 4: Cycling Kerry with Donnacha Clifford


This time our guest is Donnacha Clifford aka Kerry Cyclist. We are discussing road cycling and his new book “Cycling Kerry, great road routes” which he co-authored with David Elton. Listen to the podcast, buy his book and visit http://www.kerrycycling.com