Cycling 101 – part 3 – Health Concerns

Welcome to part 3 of this blog series dedicated to getting started with cycling. In this instalment we are going to discuss the impact cycling has on health.

Cycling and health

As controversial as this sounds, in my opinion, cycling is not the greatest sport in relation to health benefits. Don’t get me wrong. It is a great way for people of all ages and abilities to be active and to spend time in the outdoors. However, it is also important to be aware of its possible negative effects.

Without a doubt one of the best known health benefits of cycling is the cultivation of cardiovascular capacity. Large muscle groups, like the quadriceps, get activated. That forces the heart and lungs to supply oxygen-rich blood to the working muscle tissues. That in turn has a positive impact on metabolism and triggers a series of beneficial hormonal responses. The mechanism described above increases energy expenditure, the burning of calories, which may help you lose weight.

Unfortunately, we often prefer to look only at the positives and not acknowledge the negatives. Cycling is not good for our posture. As a matter of fact, while cycling we are spending a substantial amount of time, often long hours, in a relatively static and unnatural position. While our legs are working hard, our torso and upper body remain almost motionless. In addition, our upper body is leaning forward, especially on road and racing bicycles. This puts a lot of pressure on our vertebrae, from L1 to S1. The more aerodynamically aggressive the position on the bike, the greater the pressure. This means that the condition known as sciatica or lower back pain is quite common among cyclists.

Now let’s talk about the upper body. When cycling hard we often tend to tense our shoulders, neck and jaw. It is known as “hugging the ears with the shoulders”. It is important to pay attention and keep the upper body relaxed. Failure to do so leads to neck and shoulder pain. Also the unnatural pressure on our cervical vertebrae can cause numbness in our hands and arms.

Finally, the saddle. Most cyclists recognize that prolonged time on the bicycle can result in a sore bottom. It’s commonly said that this discomfort is felt only for the first 1000 miles in the season. In reality, however, a saddle is the part of the bicycle that should be carefully chosen to match the cyclist’s body type and spacing between his or her sit bones. Failure to use the correct saddle results in damaging pressure applied to the soft tissue in the perineal area. This can lead to many serious conditions like numbness or erectile dysfunction.

Now let’s look at some simple measures to mitigate the potential problems described above. Firstly, I always say that riding a bicycle is not the best way to get in shape. Actually, you need to train and get in shape to ride a bicycle. While this statement might be an exaggeration there is more than just a grain of truth in it. It is especially important to develop a strong and flexible core. This muscle complex is of paramount importance for anatomical posture and support. A strong core will provide much needed support and stabilization for the spine. This in turn will prevent lower back pain, stabilize the torso and provide a stable platform that will help to relax the upper body.

Another important and often neglected step is to get a bike fit. It is often reduced to just setting the correct saddle height. That is insufficient. In order to enjoy riding your bicycle and to avoid injury you should get a professional bike fit. During the fitting, a professional will measure the position of your torso, ankles, knees, hips, shoulders, elbows and head, while in motion. Along with your saddle height, he or she will adjust the stem length, the handlebars position, pedal alignment and many other aspects of bicycle geometry to match your body type and fitness level. For example, more flexible riders with a strong core can assume a more aerodynamic but demanding position. Riders with a lower level of fitness should be positioned more upright. Choosing the right saddle is also one of the key steps during the bicycle fit process. Note, that this step might take a few attempts and some kilometers ridden before a suitable saddle will be selected. The bicycle fit should be repeated at least every couple of years as our bodies and fitness levels are changing. A cyclist with a relaxed upright position, after a few years of training, might be able to ride in a more demanding position as their strength and flexibility improves. On the flip side, with age, riders might need to relax their position on the bicycle in order to enjoy cycling for many years to come.

Check back for part 4 of Cycling 101 in a few weeks and don’t forget to subscribe so you don’t miss the next blog post.

Episode 14: Wild Adventure Way with Caroline Birch


In this episode my guest is Caroline Birch, CEO of the Wild Adventure Way. Caroline is an energetic, positive and open-minded person. We cover a whole host of topics. We discuss what adventure is and why we need it. We cover in detail various types of surfing. We also talk about hunting and connection to the land. I hope that you will have as great a time listening to this episode as we had recording it.

Cycling 101 – part 1

When we first get into cycling it seems quite easy, as long as we already know how to ride a bicycle. After a while however, we discover that there is more to cycling than meets the eye. There are questions about safety, maintenance and other issues. Thankfully, experienced road men have already figured them out.

Choosing a bicycle

This seemingly simple task might quickly become overwhelming once we dig in to the variety of types of bicycles on the market. In general we can divide bicycles into the following categories:

Time trial bicycles – highly specialized bicycles used for racing against the clock. They are built to be as aerodynamic as possible often at the cost of adding more weight. Definitely not a bicycle you want to start with. The riding position is very demanding and use of the bicycle quite limited due to the way it is built. Outside of time trials they are also used in triathlons where the cycling leg is effectively nothing more than a time trial.

Aero bikes – road racing bicycles where the emphasis is once again put on low aerodynamic drag. They look more like your regular road bike and are much more versatile than time trial bikes. Their aerodynamic shape however, again, comes at the price of increased weight.

Climbing bikes – lightweight racing bicycles with the primary purpose of conquering those long and steep climbs. They are usable everyday bicycles and quite nice to ride due to their low weight. The gearing is adapted to climbing, so this type of bicycle might be a disadvantage in flat-road racing scenarios.

Endurance bicycles – The geometry of these bicycles is more relaxed, making them more comfortable to ride and easier to handle. The rider’s position is not as demanding, which allows for longer rides on roads with poor surfaces, without feeling tired after a mere 60 miles.

Gravel bikes – Here the geometry is becoming even more relaxed and the bicycle is even easier to handle. This type of bicycle is usually equipped with wider tyres. The build of these bicycles is sturdy and robust, so they can handle unpaved roads and trails. All that comes, of course, at the price of increased weight.

Cyclocross bikes – These bicycles have the qualities of gravel bikes taken up a notch with added handling capabilities for tight and twisty cyclocross courses. They are stiffer, which makes them less comfortable than gravel bikes. Also, their frame has a shape that makes it easier to shoulder the bicycle while running over obstacles.

Hybrid bikes / fitness bikes –  This is a general category of bicycles with quite relaxed geometry and typically straight handlebars (as opposed to drop handlebars) and wider tyres. They are not meant for racing or long demanding rides, but rather for casual, relaxing spins. They also make for good commuter bikes although the previously discussed types of bicycles would do just fine in that role (with the exception of TT bikes).

Touring bikes – These are the bicycle equivalent of camper vans. They are meant for long days and sometimes weeks of cycling. They are heavy but extremely robust. They have mounts for racks and panniers so you can take your camping equipment and other luggage with you.

Cross country bikes – Now we are entering the realm of mountain bikes. The cross country (XC) bike is the most versatile. This type of bike usually has a shorter suspension travel compared to other mountain bikes. XC bikes are lighter and suitable for climbing those steep mountain trails. They are also quite acceptable on the road, so if you need to commute before you hit that local trail, the XC bike is a great choice.

Trail bikes – These are heavier than XC bikes with longer suspension travel and slacker geometry, meaning the rider is positioned further back in relation to the center of the bike and the front wheel is further out in front. Still, they are suitable for some climbing but are most at home on long singletracks in the countryside.

Freeride / All mountain bikes – I lumped both of these types of bikes together as they represent a progression from the trail bike. The suspension travel increases, the geometry is even more slack, and they are less suitable for climbing. The emphasis is on the ability to perform big jumps and tricks while going mostly downhill.

Downhill bikes – a specialized machine for going downhill. That’s it. It is reflected in a very long suspension travel and lack of gearing for any type of climbing. Instead these bikes are equipped with large brake rotors to be able to stop effectively. The cool factor is high but stay away from this type of bicycle unless you want to take part in serious downhill racing.

That concludes my short breakdown of the types of bicycles available on the market. It is up to you, dear reader, to decide which would suit you best. Remember that nothing beats getting on a particular bicycle and trying it for yourself. If you have questions, feel free to ask them in the comments section below.

Check back for part 2 in two weeks and don’t forget to subscribe so you don’t miss the next blog post.

Episode 11: Running with Fozzy, Mike and Vinny


In this episode, my guests are three friends bound by their passion for running: Mike Kissane, who was my guest on episode 3 and his two friends Vinny and Fozzy. We discuss which of the three is the fastest runner, setting running goals, marathon pacing, and their new big challenge.

Videos:
Mike, Vinny and Fozzy After 24 Hour
Vinnie Never Again