Episode 71: The European Federation for Hunting and Conservation with David Scallan

The European Federation for Hunting and Conservation, or FACE for short, is an international organization that represents the interests of European hunters. It serves as a bridge between the institutions of the European Union and hunters.

In episode 59 I talked with Dan Curley, the chairman of NARGC, the Irish member organization of FACE. Today, however, we’re going to talk about hunting from the European perspective, with our guest, FACE Secretary General, Dr. David Scallan.

During our conversation, we discuss the biodiversity manifesto, rewilding projects, hunting’s PR, as well as the ongoing process aimed at restricting the use of lead in field sports.

Episode 70: Field Sports with Matt Cross

As regular listeners to the podcast might remember, in episode 47 we hosted Matt Cross, a field sports journalist, writer and blogger. At that time, we talked about yet another unlawful killing of a hen harrier. That episode was specifically focused on the issue of raptor persecution and we didn’t have a chance to tap into Matt’s vast knowledge about field sports.

Today we’re going to fix that as we discuss a number of topics including grouse moors management, rewilding, the ethics of field sports, the difference between the terms “shooting” and “hunting” in the UK context, and the move away from using lead in shooting. I’m sure you will enjoy our conversation.

Episode 69: The Impact of COVID-19 on Wildlife Conservation with Adam Hart

Professor Adam Hart was our guest on the podcast not long ago, in episode 66. However, given the unusual situation we are going through globally, we decided to get together again just a few weeks later. The reason is to discuss the devastating effect the COVID-19 pandemic is having on wildlife conservation. Major sources of funding for conservation, like tourism and hunting, have dried-up overnight. And with the general turmoil and uncertainty, conservation enforcement has been weakened and poaching is on the rise. We also explore the idea of a connection between the coronavirus and biodiversity loss.

If you care about wildlife and conservation you should definitely listen to this episode, learn about the situation and see if, and how, you can help.

Episode 68: Rewilding, Wolves and Biodiversity with Pádraic Fogarty

Pádraic is well known to my podcast listeners. He was our guest in episodes 20 and 35. And in episode 62 I talked with Patrick Cross about his work inspired by Pádraic’s book.

There have been many things I have wanted to talk to Pádraic about since our last podcast, which was a year and a half ago. So today I am pleased to bring you another conversation with Pádraic. We talk about rewilding, reintroduction of wolves and lynx and, last but not least, if there is a connection between the coronavirus and biodiversity loss.

Episode 67: World Sport Fishing with Richard Sheard

I had the pleasure to fish with Richard a number of years ago on the waters of Bjagos Islands archipelago in Guinea Bissau. That is without a doubt one of the highlights of my angling career. 

Richard runs World Sport Fishing, a fishing and shooting holiday outfit. So if you are after a bucket list angling experience, definitely check out their website or simply give them a call!

I probably waited way too long to invite Richard to the podcast. But today, we finally sat down and had a chat about fulfilling your sport-fishing dreams.

Episode 66: African Wildlife Conservation with Adam Hart

The issue of African wildlife conservation is very complex and difficult. There are many factors that have to be considered, some of them are literally a matter of life and death. All that immersed in a highly emotional atmosphere. This subject is infinitely interesting to me. So, today I am delighted to bring you my conversation with biologist, broadcaster, academic and author, Professor Adam Hart. During the podcast, we discuss the elephant situation in Botswana, the role of rural communities in wildlife management and the highly emotional subject of trophy hunting.

Episode 65: Multi-day Backpacking with Victoria Livschitz

Victoria Livschitz is a very successful, serial tech entrepreneur in Silicon Valley whose hectic life was profoundly changed by multi-day backpacking. That activity made her both physically and mentally healthier and better able to deal with stress at work and at home. On the podcast, we talk about her path from busy, stressed, out-of-shape newbie to conqueror of major trails. Victoria also co-founded Right On Trek a website providing logistics support for hikers, to expose more people to her favourite activity.

Episode 64: Leave No Trace with Maura Kiely

Leave No Trace is an outdoor ethics programme designed to promote and inspire responsible outdoor recreation through education, research and partnerships. Their message is all about helping outdoor enthusiasts to minimise their impact on the environment.

Today our guest is Maura Kiely who is the CEO of Leave No Trace Ireland. During the podcast, we discuss the structure of Leave No Trace, the story of Leave No Trace Ireland and the 7 principles of Leave No Trace.

Episode 63: Everything about Salmon with Thomas Cross

In this episode, our guest is one of the leading salmon scientists in the world, professor Thomas Cross. During our immensely interesting conversation, we discussed subjects like salmonids biology, salmon stocks in the wild, salmon fishing and salmon farming.

And if you are interested in the subject of salmon fishing, revisit episode 51 where we discussed the issue of illegal salmon netting on Irish rivers.

Episode 62: Whittled Away, a Photography Series, with Patrick Cross

We have talked about the book “Whittled Away – Ireland’s Vanishing Nature” twice already. In episode 20 our guest was the author, Pádraic Fogarty, who was also featured in episode 35 where I brought you the recording of his talk under the same title as the book.

Today I talk with Patrick Cross about his photographic project based on that book. We also talk about photography (the outdoors flavour), human impact on the environment and natural history.